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Mold Remediation


Mold could be Toxic! If you suspect mold growth or exposure, call us to deploy a mold remediation specialist.

There are different types of Mold:


Stachybotrys

Typically found in wood, wicker, hay, paper and cardboard. They are also commonly called ‘black mold’ and sometimes ‘toxic black mold’. This mold requires very wet or high humid conditions for days or weeks in order to grow. Common symptoms in humans are dermatitis, pain and inflammation of the mucous membranes, burning sensation in nasal passages, tightness of the chest, cough, nose bleeds, fever, headache and fatigue.


Aspergillus

Typically found in almost any home or office. Most are allergens or toxic. Aspergillus are associated with numerous respiratory disorders as well as infections of the ear and eye. Four known aspergillus mold varieties are aflatoxins, and one of the most carcinogenic substances yet discovered, more toxic than many known industrial carcinogens. They are also the most studied molds in medical research.


Cladosporium

Typically found in attics and ceilings, these fungi are known to cause skin lesions, keratitis, nail fungus, sinusitis, asthma, and pulmonary infections.


Mucor

Typically found along air conditioning systems and ducting. They are fast-growing, whitish to greyish, with usually thick growth.


Penicillin

Typically found in soil, food, grains, paint, carpet, wallpaper, interior fiberglass duct insulation, and rotting vegetation. Penicillin can cause hypersensitive pneumonitis, allergic alveolitis, and asthma in certain individuals. Common species include P. chrysogenum, P. citrinum, P. janthinellum, P. marneffei, and P. Purpurogenum.


Acremonium

This type of mold produces very potent mycotoxins (toxins produced by fungi). They have the ability to damage the immune system, organs, bone marrow, and affect mental abilities. They are a known carcinogen. Nearly all varieties release a horrible smell. Acremonium was the primary fungus in numerous homes where the occupants experienced nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.


Fusarium

Mostly found on a variety of plants as well as humidifiers. Can produce trichothecene toxins which is known to affect the circulatory and nervous system. Symptoms occur by ingestion of contaminated grain or by inhalation of spores. Can produce hemorrhages known as (alimentary toxic aleukia). Known to cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis, and even internal bleeding as well as eye, skin and nail infections.

How can you prevent mold? Again, do not attempt to remediate a mold problem yourself – let us help!


Preventive

Preventing mold from growing or spreading might be as simple as ripping up carpet in a damp basement, installing mold-resistant products, or repairing damaged gutters. Or it may be a matter of major excavation and waterproofing. Whatever the case, address the problem now. It might cost some money up front, but it will surely be costlier down the road if mold continues to grow unchecked.


Dry wet areas

Don't leave wet clothes in the washing machine, where mold can spread quickly. Hang them to dry — preferably outside or in areas with good air circulation.


Proper ventilation
Make sure an activity as simple as cooking dinner, taking a shower, or doing a load of laundry doesn't invite mold by providing proper ventilation in your bathroom, kitchen, laundry room, and any other high-moisture area. Vent appliances that produce moisture — clothes dryers, stoves — to the outside (not the attic). Use AC units and dehumidifiers (especially in humid climates), but make sure they don’t produce moisture themselves by checking them periodically and cleaning them as directed by the manufacturer.


Use moisture-resistant products:

Traditional drywall is composed of a gypsum plaster core pressed between plies of paper. Mold-resistant drywall is paperless — the gypsum core is covered in fiberglass, making the surface highly water-resistant. Moisture-resistant drywall is especially valuable in areas prone to wetness, such as bathrooms, laundry rooms, basements, and kitchens. Not only is traditional drywall more susceptible to mold than the paperless kind, but it is also difficult to rid of mold, and removal and replacement can be expensive.


Monitor Humidity

The EPA recommends keeping indoor humidity between 30 and 60 percent. You can measure humidity with a moisture meter purchased from your local hardware store. You'll also be able to detect high humidity by simply paying attention to potential problem areas in your home. Telltale signs of excessive humidity include condensation on windows, pipes, and walls.


Monitor your roof and gutters

A mold problem might be a simple matter of a roof that is leaking because of full or damaged gutters. Have your roof gutters cleaned regularly and inspected for damage.


Air out your Home

According to the EPA, as temperatures drop, the air is able to hold less moisture. Without good air flow in your home, that excess moisture may appear on your walls, windows and floors. To increase circulation, open doors between rooms, move furniture away from walls, and open doors to closets that may be colder than the rooms they’re in. Let fresh air in to reduce moisture and keep mold at bay.


Watch the plants:

They're beautiful and help keep your indoor air clean — and mold loves them. The moist soil in indoor plants is a perfect breeding ground for mold, which may then spread to other areas of your house. Instead of getting rid of your plants, try adding a bit of Taheebo tea to the water you give to your houseplants. The oil of this tree, which withstands fungi even in rain forests, helps hinder mold growth in plant soil and can be found at natural food stores.


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